Paper

Title First Author Abstract or summary Type
Social anxiety in early psychosis: the role of shame and stigma of mental illness Maria Michail

Introduction: Social anxiety disorder is surprisingly prevalent among young people with early psychosis and exerts significant impact on social disability. The processes that underlie its development remain unclear as there is no evidence that it is directly linked to psychosis vulnerability or symptoms (e.g. paranoia). In non-psychosis, social anxiety has been consistently linked to shame and perceived loss of social status. It remains unknown whether similar processes are implicated in the development of social anxiety and avoidance when this is co-morbid in psychosis.

Conference Presentations
The ultra high risk for psychosis concept - current status and future direction Alison Yung

Ultra High Risk (UHR) criteria have been developed over the last 18 years to describe a group putatively in the prodromal stage of a first episode of psychosis. Early research indicated that this group did indeed have a high risk of developing psychotic disorder, mostly schizophrenia. The discovery that it was possible to identify the prodromal phase of psychotic illnesses has had several consequences.

Conference Presentations
New research investigates the impact of peer-to-peer programs on adolescent mental health Sarah Davies

Researchers have identified that adolescents are more likely to talk to their peers than to adults. Research provides evidence that up to 90% of adolescents talk to their peers rather than to a professional when they are troubled and generally prefer to seek help from their peers, rather than from adults. Moreover, it has been found young people often doubt whether adults are capable of understanding them, or their situation, and as a consequence may believe that any assistance or advice given by an adult will be irrelevant and unhelpful.

Conference Presentations
Sussex Pathfinder Youth Mental Health Service - part 1 - Development Rick Fraser

Adolescence, the period of transition from child to adulthood, is a period of rapid emotional, physical, intellectual and social change. Half to three quarters of all mental health difficulties begin before the age of 25 (Kessler et al. 2005). Mental health and substance use problems are regarded by some to be the most important issues facing young people today (McGorry et al 2005).

Conference Presentations
Navigating the Digital Disconnect: The implications for the youth health workforce of young peoples technology use Michelle Blanchard

There is growing evidence regarding effectiveness of new technologies in improving young peoples mental health and wellbeing. Used strategically, technologies can help to overcome many of the traditional barriers to seeking help including confidentiality, stigma and physical access. While often positive results are seen from young peoples use of self directed eHealth interventions, there is some evidence that these are more effective if used as; 1) Part of a stepped care model; 2) With the support of a trained professional; or 3) As an adjunct to face to face treatment.

Conference Presentations
Seeking help online vs in person: Service extension or service modification? Debra Rickwood

headspace was set up in 2006 to improve help-seeking options for young people in Australia by providing youth-friendly, in-person mental health service centres across Australia. In 2011, it added an online platform-eheadspace-to increase its reach and make seeking help from headspace even more accessible to young people. This presentation compares the characteristics of young people accessing the different service options in terms of their demographics, presenting problems, risk factors and other variables affecting help-seeking behaviour.

Conference Presentations
Transforming practice in youth mental health services through innovative data collection processes Debra Rickwood

Data collection processes for health service monitoring and reporting are usually considered burdensome by service providers and irksome by clients, and the data provided are invariably found to be poor quality by those who need to use it. The Australian innovation in youth mental health service delivery, headspace, has also been plagued by these common problems whereby data processes were not effectively meeting organisational, staff or young peoples needs.

Conference Presentations
Expanding help-seeking options for young people by delivering mental health services online and on the phone Sandra Radovini

Young people have the highest need for mental health care across the lifespan, yet the lowest level of service use. Improving access to appropriate mental health care and increasing engagement with services is a priority for mental health reform in Australia. Providing services and interventions via online and mobile technologies is increasingly a focus for improving access and engagement for young people.

Conference Presentations
Measuring outcomes from ehealth services; how do they compare for headspace and eheadspace Nic Telford

Young people have the highest rates of mental illness than any other age group in Australia with one-in-four experiencing a mental health problem within any 12-month period. However this high rate of mental illness is not matched by a corresponding level of service use. In response the Australian government funded headspace, the National Youth Mental Health Foundation. Since opening in 2006 headspace has provided youth-friendly services to more than 80,000 young people at its 40 centres across Australia.

Conference Presentations
A population-level prediction tool for the incidence of first episode psychosis James Kirkbride

Background: Health commissioners require precise information on local population needs that vary enormously according to social and demographic factors. These are often unrecognised or ignored, as was the case when early intervention in psychosis services [EIS] for young people with first episode psychosis [FEP] were commissioned in England and Wales. We sought to develop a realistically-complex, population-based prediction tool to forecast incidence rates, using FEP as proof-of-principle.

Conference Presentations

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