Paper

Title First Author Abstract or summary Type
Promotingsocial recovery in youth mental health: detection, intervention and the PRODIGY trial David Fowler

Prevention of social disability associated with severe and complex mental health problems is a key target for youth mental health services. Lifestyle patterns of social withdrawal begin in adolescence often associated with complex emotional problems and if left untreated can become lead to long term social disability. Unfortunately, at present many young people do not receive effective interventions and their needs are not detected or addressed. While lack of education and employment may be detected few services are equipped to address complex mental health symptoms.

Conference Presentations
Addressing School Mental Health through the School-based Integrated Pathway to Care model Ms Yifeng Wei

Replacement

Conference Presentations
Can school based CBT prevention programmes reduced depression in young adolescents? Results from the UK PROMISE trial Paul Stallard

Randomised controlled trials have demonstrated that Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is an effective psychological treatment for adolescent depression. However psychological treatments have limited reach, many adolescents do not respond and relapse rates are high resulting in growing interest in depression prevention programmes. Schools offer a convenient location to deliver these programmes although methodologically robust evaluations under everyday conditions are required to prove their effectiveness.

Conference Presentations
Time to Reflect: Enhancing the self-_efficacy of secondary school wellbeing personnel in recognising and responding to mental health needs of students Judy Ring

Introduction: Time to Reflect (TTR) is an innovative six-session professional development program for secondary school wellbeing personnel jointly designed and delivered by an educational and a youth mental health specialist service. The program provides education on a range of mental health-related topics and offers participants an opportunity to reflect constructively on their current practices, thereby fostering development and generalisation of competencies.

Conference Presentations
The importance of brand in leading young people to services Sarah Shiell

The question was clear-how do you attract young people into a new youth-focussed mental health service in a way that is contemporary and relevant to their experiences when traditionally the audience is difficult to engage? The at times overwhelming stigma young people and the community around them attach to mental health issues has long been a barrier to help seeking.

Conference Presentations
Seeing differently: Using the arts to create and disseminate youth mental health research Katherine Boydell

It is widely acknowledged that research findings often fail to make their way into the hands of the individuals who need the information. In particular, policy and decision-makers, families and young people do not receive the research knowledge because traditional academic forms of communication such as publication in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at scientific conferences are often not available or accessible. As a result, there has been an increased focus on knowledge translation and consideration of different ways to make research more accessible to a wider audience.

Conference Presentations
Young Peoples Experiences of Family Connectedness Elise Woodman

This presentation shares the findings of a qualitative research project that looked at how young people construct a sense of family connectedness. This research was conducted by Elise Woodman as part of a social work PhD with the Australian Catholic University and the Canberra-based Institute of Child Protection Studies. The research topic was chosen in response to concerns about the extent of mental health issues experienced by young people. Research has found family connectedness to be central to young peoples mental health and wellbeing.

Conference Presentations
Adolescent brain development and risk for psychosis Mary Cannon

During the past decade, there has been a growing interest in psychotic-like s ymptoms among children and adolescents. For years, such symptoms were not asked about by child and adolescent mental health professionals as it was considered that these experiences were meaningless in the absence of a psychotic diagnosis. However, there is now compelling evidence from population-based cohorts that self-reported psychotic symptoms in early adolescence are associated with a higher risk of psychotic illness in adulthood.

Conference Presentations
All that glitters is not gold-coupling cutting edge technology with whole-service innovation to deliver a state-of-the-artonlinemental health service to young people Kerrie Buhagiar

Increasingly young people are looking online to provide an alternative to traditional mental health services, as they are anonymous, accessible, and available when many other services are not. The Inspire Foundations flagship program, ReachOut.com, is an online youth mental health service providing information, stories and peer support to young Australians going through tough times for over 15 years. In 2011/12, over 1.4 million young people accessed ReachOut.com.

Conference Presentations
Bridging the Digital Disconnect-Using Technology to Support Young Peoples Mental Health Needs Derek Chambers

Replacement

Conference Presentations

Pages