Paper

Title First Author Abstract or summary Type
Systems of care: Helping Children and Youth with Serious Mental Health Conditions Gary Blau

This session will provide information and details about the development and implementation of the system of care approach to serving children and youth with serious mental health conditions in the United States. The U.S. Congress established the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services Program for Children and Their Families to support the development of systems of care for children and youth with serious mental health conditions and their families.

Conference Presentations
A new way to support families and friends in youth mental health Victoria Ryall

The involvement of family and friends in mental health service delivery can be of considerable benefit in the mental health outcomes of young people; reducing the incidence of relapse, improving adherence to treatment, improving family functioning, increasing periods of wellness, and improving the young persons quality of life and social adjustment. headspace recognises family and friends are central to the support of young people with mental health difficulties. Families and friends may be the first to notice a change in a young person.

Conference Presentations
Phenomenology, intensity and impact of psychotic symptoms in first-presentation borderline personality disorder versus first-episode psychosis Richard Kerslake

Introduction Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is common in youth. Its diagnostic criteria include cognitive and perceptual disturbances but attempts to define how paranoid ideation in BPD is distinct from those experiences of psychosis in non-BPD patients remains inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have attempted to characterise the phenomenology and intensity of psychotic symptoms in BPD or address their impact on functioning.

Conference Presentations
Extended phenotypes for hypomania, depression and psychosis are common and frequently co-occur in teenagers and young adults: evidence from the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study Ian Hickie

Background: Large-scale population-based studies identify that symptoms of psychosis, depression and alcohol or other substance misuse are actually quite common in the wider community. However, less is known about the occurrence of hypomanic symptoms or the co-occurrence of extended phenotypes (hypomanic-like, psychotic-like or depressive-like episodes: HMLEp, PLEp, DEp).

Conference Presentations
A new paradigm in mental health care for young people in Singapore Swapna Verma

The results of a recently concluded Singapore Mental Health Study showed that 90% of the common mental illnesses had their onset before the age of 29 years; however, only 31 % of these young people sought help. This led us to conduct focus groups with key stakeholders which included young people, where concerns with the current state of mental health service provision such as costs, stigma and confidentiality, and accessibility were raised.

Conference Presentations
The Birmingham Youthspace model of early detection and prevention for youth mental health Max Birchwood

Responding to findings that the majority of emerging mental disorder in young people is not appropriately identified or treated at the time of first appearance alongside the knowledge that transitions between child and adult mental health services is poorly managed (Singh et al., 2009), the Birmingham Youthspace programme was developed in South Birmingham UK to work across the 14-25 year age group in partnership with the Princes Trust, St Basils and other third sector organisations.

Conference Presentations
Evolution of Youth Mental Health Services in Norfolk: From an intensive outreach approach for high-risk 14-18 year olds within an Early Intervention Service to development of a full Youth Mental Health Service Jon Wilson

Adolescence and young adulthood is a key developmental period during which severe mental illness emerges, and social exclusion and disability may evolve. Research has shown that unmet complex social and emotional needs are identifiable before the onset of psychotic symptoms (Yung et al., 2003) and that early detection and prevention should focus on relatively non-specific complex mental disorder associated with social decline (McGorry, 2000). Such a focus would reduce the risks for a range of disorders and is likely to be cost effective from a service perspective.

Conference Presentations
The UK TRACK projects CAMHS-adult transitions: New approaches to integrated care pathways Swaran Singh

Background: The interface between child and adult mental health services has long been considered an impediment to continuity of care. However little is known about the nature or magnitude of any care gap the outcomes and experiences of those who reach the transition boundary for child services. Aims: TRACK was a multisite, mixed-methods study that explored the process, outcome and experience of transition from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to adult (AMHS) care in six healthcare Trusts in London and West Midlands, UK.

Conference Presentations
ycentral-Development of an Integrated Youth Mental Health Service Platform, NSW, Australia Deb Howe

Introduction: Central Coast Children and Young Peoples Mental Health (CYPMH) is based on the NSW Central Coast and has been an innovator in the development of youth mental health service models. In 2006 CYPMH was chosen as the prototype youth mental health service model for NSW and as part of a consortium group was chosen as one of the first ten headspace funded centres. Subsequently CYPMH and headspace jointly developed and funded ycentral a one stop youth mental health shop specifically tailored to meet the needs of young people aged 12 to 25 years.

Conference Presentations
Addressing Workforce Challenges for Youth Mental Health Reform in the Australian Context Kerryn Pennell

Youth mental health is a public health issue of major interest to developing and developed economies worldwide and requires a significant reform effort, driven by a solid evidence base. The peak period for the emergence of mental ill health is youth, with the onset of most psychiatric disorders falling within a relatively discreet time band from the early teens to the mid-twenties, reaching a peak in the early twenties. Over the last seven years Australian Governments have progressively expanded access for young Australians to new holistic youth mental health models of care.

Conference Presentations

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