Paper

Title First Author Abstract or summary Type
Stigma and youth mental health problems: Why social context is important Elis Hennessey

The term stigma has been widely used in the social sciences since the 1960s, however until recently it has rarely been applied in the context of youth mental health. This paper, which addresses the stigma of youth mental health, has two main aims. The first is to explain what is meant by stigma and to give examples of stigma drawn from interviews with young people with mental health problems.

Conference Presentations
Gamifying mental health to reach young people Sarah Shiell

Early in 2013, headspace and the Cotton On Foundation joined forces to create a world first youth mental health campaign with the potential to reach more than several hundred thousand young Australians. Cotton On is an Australian clothing retail chain that operates across 800 stores in nine countries. It has a track record for engaging its (predominantly young) staff, through a range of wellbeing and social inclusion projects.

Conference Presentations
Failed by the NHS Growing up with Mental health issues - reflections Jonny Benjamin

Jonny and Kimberley both featured in a recent BBC Three documentary which explored how young people with mental health problems are often failed by the mental health service in the UK. Jonny, who has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder, was turned away from an A&E department with no further help when he was suicidal and suffering from psychosis. Kimberley has depression and anxiety, and was let down by CAMHS at 18 when they failed to transition her to the adult mental health service, leading to a detoriation in her mental health.

Conference Presentations
Multisystemic Therapy for Emerging Adults (MST-EA): Extending Therapy through Vocational Coaching Ashli Sheidow

Emerging adults (EAs) who have serious mental health conditions (SMHCs) and recent justice system involvement are at great risk of re-arrest. Further, their transition to adulthood can be tremendously compromised in functional realms, with a 42% unemployment rate and a 45% high school dropout rate among EAs with SMHC. Likewise, positive engagement in school or work, stable residence, and strong relationships can reduce recidivism.

Conference Presentations
RE-FRAME-IT A randomised controlled trial investigating the impact of an Internet-based intervention on school students experiencing suicidal ideation Jo Robinson

Introduction: Suicidal ideation is common amongst adolescents, and school counsellors are often the first point of contact. However there is little evidence regarding effective interventions for this population. E-health interventions are becoming increasingly popular and have been shown to be effective in the treatment and prevention of depression and anxiety. However they remain untested in suicidal youth, hence representing a gap in knowledge.

Conference Presentations
Overcoming barriers to providing effective youth mental health in primary care Dick Churchill

Primary healthcare services provide the first point of contact for patients seeking help for a wide range of health-related problems. However, despite the fact that approximately one-third of young people who consult a general practitioner (GP) have a diagnosable mental health disorder, only one-third of these are detected, and only about 5% of consultations are explicitly about mental health issues.

Conference Presentations
A primary care model of youth mental health-The Well Centre Stephanie Lamb

The Well Centre is a youth health hub serving 13-19 year olds in Lambeth, South London. It was set up to improve access to Primary care services to a highly diverse local population where there is socio-economic deprivation, health inequality and sub-populations of young people who are likely to be at risk of poor physical and mental wellbeing. It has been operating since October 2011 and offers integrated care from General Practitioners, youth workers and an experienced mental health early intervention nurse seconded from South London and Maudsley CAMHS.

Conference Presentations
Same but different: Examining the similarities and differences between young people who self-harm and those who are also at risk of suicide Alex Hains

Rationale: Non-suicidal self-harm is a symptom of severe emotional distress and is one of the most significant predictors of suicide attempts. Self-harm occurs at a rate of one every 8 minutes in Australia, and rates are increasing for those between the ages of 15 and 24 years. Understanding why young people self-harm and exploring the relationship between self-harm and suicide is critical to providing effective supports and treatments for young people at risk of suicide.

Conference Presentations
Suicidal ideation in Australias young men: findings from the first Young and Well CRC National Survey Georgina Luscombe

Background: Suicide is the leading cause of death for young men in Australia (accounting for between 26% and 29% of deaths in males aged 15 to 24 years). Young men have higher rates of substance use disorders than women (16% vs 10%) and the rate of suicide is three times higher. Despite the perception that self-harm is a female problem, the Australian National Epidemiological Study of Self-Injury recently reported that rates of self-injury for females peaked at 18 to 24 years and for males at 10 to 17 years, with prevalence no greater in females than males.

Conference Presentations
Adolescents exposed to suicidal behaviour of others: prevalence of self-harm and associated psychological, lifestyle, and life event factors Elaine McMahon

Background: Self-harm is a major public health problem and there is evidence for the clustering and contagion of self-harm, especially among adolescents. We examined the prevalence of self-harm among young people exposed to self-harm/suicide of others versus those without this experience and compared sub-groups of young people with different histories of exposure to suicidal behaviour in terms of a broad range of factors from lifestyle, life event and psychological domains.

Conference Presentations

Pages